Arkansas Corn Facts

Arkansas corn farmers typically plant their corn in March or April, and it is usually the first crop to be planted for Arkansas farmers. Corn will typically be harvested around August and September. 

Roughly 70% of all corn grown in Arkansas goes to poultry feed mills, with the other 30% going to the export market. 

On average, the area planted in corn has increased around 6.3% each year, while the average yield has increased 1.6% each year. This has led to increased corn production in Arkansas. 

For 2023 Arkansas farmers collectively harvested around 830,000 acres with an average yield of 183 bushels an acre, resulting in 151,890,000 bushels in production. This equated to around $789,828,000 in production value. 

According to USDAs 2022 Ag Census data, these counties were the top five corn producing counties in Arkansas: 

  1. Arkansas
  2. Lonoke
  3. Phillips
  4. Lee
  5. Jefferson

There are multiple uses for corn but some of the most well known are: 

  1. Animal Feed
  2. Glues/Adhesives
  3. Textiles
  4. Sugar/Baking Mixes
  5. Soap/Insecticide
  6. Ice Cream
  7. Fuel
  8. Paper products
  9. Tires
  10. Ethanol/Industrial Alcohol
  11. Cooking Oils/Salad Dressing
  12. Alcoholic Beverages

Corn Fact

Arkansas Grain Sorghum Facts

Arkansas grain sorghum (milo) farmers typically plant their milo in May, and it is usually harvested in September. Most milo grown in the state is produced in the Mississippi River Delta region of Eastern Arkansas. 

Total reported milo acres for 2023 in Arkansas was 12,137, with an average yield of 80 bu/ac, this would bring total Arkansas milo production to 970,960 bushels. This is around $5,050,000 in production value. 

According to USDAs 2022 Ag Census data, these counties were the top five milo producing counties in Arkansas: 

  1. Cross
  2. Lee
  3. Lawrence
  4. Mississippi
  5. Jackson